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of the middle east, and extraordinary new ways of looking at science and medicine when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. the middle east where president obama is in the midst of a three day visit to israel it marks his first visit to the country as president, speaking in jerusalem today the prident urged israelies to make sacrifices in the interests of sustainable peace with the palestinians. >> israelis must recognize that continued settlement activity is counterproductive to the cause of peace. and that an independent palestine must be viable, with real borders that have to be drawn. >> rose: the president also affirmed that america will continue to stand behind israel. he made a targeted appeal to the youth in attendance. >> and today i want to tell you, particularly the young people, so that there is no mistake here, so long as there is a united states of america, atem lo lavat. (applause) you are not alone. >> rose: joining me martin indyk, director of
's engage on the science. let me hear what your arguments are and then let's respond to them. and i would ask in turn that you listen to what the scientific community has to say. it's perfectly fine to have a great conversation with many people about the science itself because the science is so robust at this point. i mean, we have basically known for over 20 years now that, and it actually boils down, for all the complexity of the science it's really quite simple. it's real, okay, climate change is real. it is mostly human caused this time. there have been climate changes over many millions of years in the past that had nothing to do with human beings. this time it's mostly being caused by our activities. third, it's going to be bad. in fact, it's bad now and it's going to get worse. fourth, there's hope, that there are lots of solutions already on the table that are in fact already being implemented in this country, communities all across this country as well as around the world. there's an enormous amount of work that we can do right now with things that we have in hand. and then last
, urs, and i will introduce the science who led that team and acted as the consultant to recommend the design criteria and the dvs led the consulting to the tjpa to make sure that the recommendations coming from urs, were reasonable and prudent. and did not not over or under address, the concerns and the nature of the facility and more appropriate for the nature of the facility. widening the associates and specializes in particular, on structural and blast analysis, and vehicle force protection. they have one in 64 years of experience, in that arena since experience with federal laboratories, courthouses embassies, as well as working on the pentagon and many of the same facilities in the city of new york, where dvs has addressed general security issues. they have focused on blast and force protection on those facilities. also as part of the peer review and consulting team to tjpa is code consultants ink. cci, and they focus particularly on fire protection and fire life safety issues and were extensively involved in the peer review of the bus fire and train fire scenarios, designed
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of behavioral science? >> i think i do not want a may wore who is a behavioral scientist ex-pairmenting. the point, we should just have the death penalty for smokers. >> they do have a death penalty self-induced. >> everything you can do to try to discourage behavior all comes down on the smoker. there is lots of behavior are that is worse. i praise the mayor for the campaign against teenage pregnancy as he calls it. the problem is unwed pregnancy and the liberals in the new york times upset about the shaming campaign. shaming clearly works. liberals love shaming. >> i agree. >> they love stigmatizing. when they pretend to be wednesday unwed motherhood they can't against it or allow stigmatizing. >> geraldo: before we get to liberals being against the stigmatization of unwed pregnancy stick to the cigarette displays. is the mayor right and isn't this is a giant step in the nanny state it. >> yes, and like big gulp. i think people are aware. i always claim i don't believe the studies on smoking but i'm joking. people snow smoking is bad for you and all of the stick the worldc
the science and business of addictive food with, author michael moss, coming up next. ♪ i'm your venus [ female announcer ] what does beauty feel like? find out with venus embrace. every five-bladed stroke gives you 360 degrees of smooth for goddess skin you can feel and feel. ♪ i'm your venus only from venus embrace. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just about anything. go. ♪ keep on going in this direction. take this bridge over here. there it is! [ man ] so i used mine to get a whole new perspective. [ laughter ] [ male announcer ] earn points with the citi thankyou card and redeem them for just about anything. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. ♪ the middle of this special mom
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
katrinas, .72% of a degree. that that's nothing. and that's why science actives working so hard at this. also, this global warming study category four and five hurricanes in all ocean basins have increased at a rate of about 25% to 30%. this is no joke, this is science. let's bring in a science nick maloshus as stanford, thanks for being on "the young turks" today. >> thanks for having me. michael: tell us what kind of big news pete is. how innovative and exciting is this for people really worried about this issue? >> i think it's a really interesting technique in that it adds to the efficiency of systems already in place. if you think about these large power towers where you take reflective mirrors and focus it on to a central tower to create steam, this increases the efficiency so it becomes economically viable. michael: explain what we are looking at here. we are looking at pete. explain what's going on, that sort of yellow gray thing at the top and take us through how it works. >> yeah, so this is a simplified diagram of how the physical process would actually work. we have two para
golden age this span of the 17th century where trade, industry and science were among the world. the one small port of amsterdam were one of the commercial centers in the entire world. this concentration of capital enriched bankers and merchants but also created the society in europe. the arch of the dutch golden age. 17th century travelers visiting holland remarked on the number of artist. typically western european artist on the monarch and the nobility as well as the very wealthie catholic church. an open market to a wide clientele that arranged from variety of merchants. it displays a modern domestic rather than extravagant or royal setting which it was carried. emily who is the director of the morris house. the expansion which i will talk about in an a little bit will give it more space. for the collection there is a limited pictures they can acquire but too large for the building. so where do the paintings come from? how can they be there. this is an exceptional and remarkable museum. this splendid 17th century city palace was constructed between 1633-1634 next to the dutch gove
believe republicans are anti-immigrant. >> our message was weak. >> anti-woman. anti-science. >> we weren't inclusive. >> anti-gay. anti-worker. >> there's a long list of them. >> the list goes on and on and on. >> buck up or stay in the truck. buck up and run. >> i'd say, if i did run for office and win, i'd serve out my term. >> if standing for liberty and standing for the constitution makes you a wackobird, chen count me a proud wackobird. >> cpac had to cut back on its speakers this year by 300 pounds. >> barack obama, you lied. >> i think it's about dignity and respect. >> so this go-round, he's got the rifle, i've got the rack. >>> we begin with the republican party facing a serious case of the mondays. after a weekend carouse iing at cpac, no doubt downing a few in honor of st. patrick, today came the reckoning with the revelation of their own autopsy on what went badly wrong in 2012. this morning, it fell to rnc chair, reince priebus to give his party an uncompromising look in the rearview mirror. >> our message was weak. our ground game was insufficient. we weren't inclusive. we
be minimized. this senate commerce, science and transportation subcommittee hearing is an hour 15 minutes. >> [inaudible] >> good morning. we are delighted to have this meeting in the new congress of our science and space subcommittee. nasa and the space programs have been in the news a lot in the past year. some really impressive feats, and we're going to be talking about some of those from rover on mars to the birthing of the spacex capsule at the international space station. i am delighted to have my colleague, senator chris in texas, as our ranking member. -- senator chris. it seems like texas and florida have some interest in the space program. and i'm looking forward to his leadership and i would ask for his opening statement. >> well, thank you, mr. chairman. let me echo those sentiments and say how much i'm looking forward to working with you on this subcommittee. spaceflight and our capacity to maintain world leading advantage in spaceflight is a critical priority for the nation. and certainly a critical priority both for the state of texas and the state of florida, and so i am e
, she thinks nbc is at the top of the ratings. >> and on wednesday, more science. >> things were once thought to be extinct can in and out be brought back from the dead. so there is hope for nbc. it could turn around. >> reporter: we called nbc for comment but got none. of course comedians always bite the hand that feeds them. listen to howard stern rip apart the chief financial officer of his employer, sirius/xm radio amid contract negotiations. >> why the. [ beep ] would i take a pay cut when i'm the one who is actually performed? can you [ beep ] whoever the [ beep ] you are. i never heard of you. >> reporter: todays later, howard agreed to a new contract, terms undisclosed. the moral of the story, beware of antagonizing a man with a mike. a big mike. taking the cake was charlie sheen attacking his by then ex-boss, executive producer chuck lori. >> sad and stupid had a foul odor attached it to, it would you. you picked a fight with a war lock you little worm. >> reporter: sort of makes jay's jokes seem gentle. >> st. patrick drove all the snakes out of ireland. >> reporter: jeannie
for more. host: said arikat, there has been discussion as to what the chemical weapons were used in science syria. in a news over the last 48 hours inside syria. any news over the last 48 hours? guest: the state department has no evidence to show that the syrian government or the opposition -- there have been opposition -- accusations on both sides about using chemical weapons. there has been no evidence of that. the united nations is leading an effort to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. there are all kinds of technical things involved. they need to conduct these experts to determine if it is by a examination or looking at injuries to determine whether chemical weapons have been used. we have been told by people in the intelligence community the for the regime to use chemical weapons, there are logistical problems. thus far, there has been no evidence. host: a follow-up from one of our viewers. it is in the rebels' interest to use chemical weapons. there is no upside for president assad to do it. this headline from the baltimore sun. the president urging a palestinian stat
incubator, and make room for the next big idea-- like enbio, a materials science company, also launched from university college dublin. the startup is pioneering new treatments for metals that won a contract for the heatshields on the european space agency's orbiter heading to the sun in the coming years. karl flannery, who started his own tech services company storm technologies during the boom years, is worried about a talent shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing p
. it is not rocket science. it is simple stuff. this is something that -- you talk to manufacturing, manufacturers and it is the number one issue you here. there's a frustration, because the manufacturing community knows we are on the verge of michigan, on the verge of doing something special, but in order to get there, skilled workforce and the innovative work force, productive work force is going to meet the short-term challenges and put their as we think about this, the skills issue is about a short- term fit to a critical problem. but then it is about long-term solutions. if we can get to a place where we have right, innovative, productive, well-trained and educated people in the workforce, that will set manufacturing to continue to compete and grow. this all links together. hopefulething we are we will see move in the coming weeks and months in the senate. we will continue to work with you and try to be a supportive as we can. i look forward to the discussion. >> thank you. >> it is great to be here with you, senator. as i think about the skills gap , i think about science, technology, and ge
all the science and all the statistics show that a gun in the home won't protect you against intruders which there aren't very many but does hugely is crease increase accident or suicide by a member in the family. as america is becoming safer in the face of crime, americans are choosing to arm themselves less. change is going to come not from the political system to the country but from the country to the political system. and as more and more americans make a decision, i don't want one for myself because i recognize how dangerous it is inside my home. you will see maybe more space for political change. start with things like background checks. start with things like keeping guns away from the most dangerous people, people with court orders for dples violence rather than trying to change these appalling but very rare terrible multiple murders. >> thanks very much to both of you. >>> still to come, a man who served 22 years in prison for the murder of a rabbi in new york is free tonight. his conviction has been tossed out. cnn was there the minute he walked out a free man. >>> plus, the
the same science that brought us dolly the cloned sheep has advanced to the point where scientists might be able to bring them back. the extinction is national geographic story. >> maybe it got frozen somehow, you can use that to create an embryo, you can implant it in a living animal, that egg will become an animal. >> don't expect t-rex with the museum of natural history. >> you have to divide it into stone cold dead, which is what dinosaurs are, they're fossils, and then things that went recently extinct that you may have specimen of what amounts to be the carcass of the animal. >> the extinction happened, in 2003, a team of french scientists brought back a type of mountain goat. the last one died in 1990, but scientists preserved cells and were able to genetically engineer it and it lived ten minutes before dying. while it may be cool to have them back, there are a number of ethical issues. the animal habitat may no longer exist. what happens in this new world of genetics where people pick and choose genetic quality. >> the technology is the same with a passenger pigeon or virus. wha
to do that? >> we're not telling them at all. we're telling them what science says is or isn't in their interest. we allow you to smoke. we just don't let you smoke where other people have to breathe the smoke that you -- that you're exhaling or comes from your cigarette. the same thing with obesity which incidentally is a public interest because we're going to spend $5 billion on treating people of 0 obesity in our hospitals in new york city alone this year. but regardless -- >> where is the line? where is it too far for government to go? >> i do not think we should ban most things. i do think there are certain times we should infringe on your freedom and that is, for example, if you're drinking we shouldn't let you drive because you'll kill somebody else. if you are carrying a gun, we shouldn't let you on an airplane. there's a lot of things that we do -- if there's asbestos in the classroom we should remove the kids from classroom until you clean the air. if you want to own a gun, i certainly think it's constitutionally protected. you certainly have a right to have a gun i
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, t
york city. model n based in redwood city and makes revenue management software for life sciences and technology companies. the company's ceo in new york for that bell ringing. officially did the honors. that is on the new york stock exchange. shares popped right out of the gate. the stock price is up by close to 35%, trades on the market today. the company's share started a dollar more than what was expected by the experts. >>> american airlines defending its plan to give its outgoing ceo almost $20 million in severance pay. american airlines ceo is being replaced by the chief executive officer of us airways, as soon as the two companies complete their merger. a trustee overseeing american airlines bankruptcy objects to the payout. american says bankruptcy code does not apply because the payout will be made by the new airline after the merger pulls it out of bankruptcy. >>> ebay is taking aim at amazon overhauling fees for sellers on the website. starting in april, ebay will let sellers list items for free. ebay will charge 4% to 10% items sold. the new fees are lower than amazon
be a lot higher than previously thought according to new research from the cdc. tonight our chief science correspondent robert bazell has a look at what's behind these new numbers. >> reporter: the latest numbers show that autism diagnoses have grown to the point where parents report that fully 1 in 50 school age children has autism. aiden myers was diagnosed two years ago. >> i think it's scary. i think that we obviously need to figure out what is going on. >> reporter: hello, aiden. how do you do? no one doubts aiden myers's diagnosis. he is clearly not terribly disabled. he was late starting to speak and he's working to overcome learning disabilities at the reed academy in new jersey. >> awesome job. >> reporter: the latest numbers from a telephone survey with the federal government showed the highest increases occurring in mild cases like aiden's along the spectrum of autism disorders as opposed to children who are severely withdrawn socially and often unable to speak. the government survey find that is the reported number of children with autism grew from 1.16% in 2007 to 2% now. tha
children in the event of a fire in the home. there is an emerging body of science telling us what a lot of us parents already know -- kids sleep more soundly than adults. it can take a lot more to wake them up and smoke alarms may not be a match for a sleeping child. we get our report tonight from our nbc national investigative correspondent jeff rossen. [ alarm ] >> reporter: it's the sound we rely on to wake us up in a fire. but experts say in many cases children will sleep right through a smoke alarm. could that really be true? we set up a test at this house in connecticut. home to the hollander family -- parents michelle and josh and their three boys. we installed infrared cameras in the kids' bedrooms and in the middle of the night had a local fire captain set off the smoke alarm. would they wake up? [ alarm ] >> there it goes. >> reporter: we are watching with their parents on a monitor downstairs. seconds go by. then a minute. then two minutes. the boys keep sleeping. >> this could be a real fire right now. >> they would sleep right through it. it's so scary that the kids can sle
capita, per student with the rank and 25 otas 37 default nation's, 17 in science and 14 and reading? >> when i share those statistics with people they cringe a little bit. we are 25th in math and some of the countries ahead of us are hon mariana slovenia. i think as americans we don't expect to be behind slovenia or hungary. when i started years ago someone showed me a scatter plot of all of the developed nations in the world and on the one access it was academic achievement levels of the students and on the other access was the amount of money that country spends per child on their public education system. we were in the cauldrons that you do not want to be which is spending a lot of money and have poor results and the only other thing that was in the squadron plus luxembourg. i think the problem with this notion is that for decades, people have been pushing this idea that what we need in order to fix a system is more money, more money. but when i got to d.c. it wasn't the case they were more than any of our jurisdiction and the entire nation. in new york and new jersey they're spe
that i only heard in eighth grade science class, the last science class i had, the chart has gone parabolic. did i ever claim to work at the jet propulsion lab? what it meant was that stocks had started to go up in pretty much a very steep slope. this is a parabola. so steep that the angle is getting a little dangerous if you're all the way up here, right? here it's still pretty good and you get there and it's a nice place to plunge, right? and you got to wait so that time would pass and it wouldn't be such a steep parabola. she wasn't saying that we were going to crash at all. she wasn't saying the companies weren't any good. she was simply stating that it leaves little room for error particularly when you're in the straight-up portion of the parabola. it's plenty of them as this list of parabolic stocks that i wrote down shows. this is incredible. i know. i hadn't really had this many stocks in parabola motion and they've risen the highest and the hardest and the ones taking the cake are the insurers and the banks, some of the transports. those insurers and bank stocks were stro
government spending. 2.5 trillion more, on, quote, job creation. another 2.2 trillion on things like science, energy, the environment and education. also the cpc does not want to cut entitlements. and, wants to give unemployed americans 99 weeks of cash compensation. nearly two years. the question is what does president obama think of the congressional progressive caucus? my opinion, he likes it i don't think the president believes that crew is fanatical because they want what he wants. by the way, the far left kooks do want to cut one thing, defense spending. they want to bring that back down to 2006 level. somewhere in iran is cheering. there comes a point when americans are going to have to decide what country, what kind of country they want. even taking half of what affluent americans earn, feds couldn't possibly afford what the far left wants to provide. so we would eventually become greece or cyprus if the u.s. dollar collapses and people stop lending us money. some conservatives believe that's exactly what the far left wants. a collapse of the entire capitalistic system. some on the r
, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> this is a great apartment. >> yes, but i'm dressed like a woman. >> it's cheap. >> yes, but i'm dressed like a woman. >> we will constantly be surrounded by beautiful girls. >> it is nice and airy, isn't it. >> so gentlemen, joined by peter scolari, your great friend of more than 35 years. you starred together in "bosom buddies." you keep bringing up my tabloid muckraking. we bring up your cross-dressing past. the obvious question for both of you, are you still wearing women's clothes? >> currently? >> only to appear taller. that's all. the heels do make you a little taller. >> you mean right now? >> those are for the pilot. we had bob tortoricci was our costumer for the actual series, not the pilot. he put us in -- he would come into our dressing room, say tom, i think we're going to start you out in fuchsia. >> very serious. >> very serious. >> holding up fabric. can you put on this wrap. you know what we were told, i'm sure you'll recall, the drag element, that's ju
shows and science fiction. we are talking about the bionic eye. but what was once fiction is now fact. we are going to talk to the doctor giving sight to the blind with his unbelievable cutting-edge technology. we're here! we're going to the park! [ gina ] oh hey, dan! i really like your new jetta! and you want to buy one like mine because it's so safe, right? yeah... yeah... i know what you've heard -- iihs top safety pick for $159 a month -- but, i wish it was more dangerous, like a monster truck or dune buggy! you can't have the same car as me! [ male announcer ] now everyone's gointo want one. let's get a jetta. [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. >>> you may recalled '70s television series
a big new university called the king abdullah university of science and technology, which not only makes a saudi men and women, but mixes them with infidel men and women from all over the world. and when one of the 20 senior religious scholars was asked about the appropriateness of this on tv, he said it's wrong. and the king fired him because the king appoints these 20 people, and not surprisingly, many of the other senior men began to discover that the prophet had had his hair washed by women, and other things that made this okay. so people see this, if you will, double standard, and it has undermined it, the credibility of the religious establishment. obviously, with the deeply religious but also with those who don't mind the mixing at all, but just think it's, if they can can get the religious to approve this, why can't they make them approve more things like women driving or whatever. the second pillar of stability in the kingdom is obviously the oil wealth that buys them at least acquiescence, if not loyalty anymore, for the government and royal family. 90% of the treasury in saudi
best with their married mother and father. >> that is not true. >> it is. all the social science evidence. >> you're saying it's a utopia. >> no, i'm knot. i'm looking at the evidence. john, go ahead. >> i think it's not fundamentally about that counterpoint and what social science says or doesn't say. i think it's about listening to people across america and speaking with people who are in same-sex relationships or who identify as lgbt. if you listen to them with an empathetic ear, you can hear where they're coming from, that we basically have two legal systems set up, one for gay and lesbian people and one for the rest of the country. i think it's more about just sort of taking an honest and open approach to listening to these people and hearing what they have to say and where they're coming from. and that's what i try to do with my reporting. >> it's also important to come on to tell the truth and not spread rumors and infactual information. >> what did i say that was incorrect? >> because -- forget it. what you're saying is that it's not illegal, and it is illegal. that's the
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. lookake's >>> take's look at the crowd surrounding post 9 this morning and it is rare to see all of these people and there is one reason you're seeing all of these people and it is because of model. one of the most anticipated ipos of the week. the week being the busiest week for ipos so far this year. we're a quarter in and also this huge bull run and a lot of people and companies want to get out of the gate and raise their money. we'll talk to the ceo of model n right after the bell is rung and after the first trade is exec e executed and we have about a minute to go before the opening bell on wall street. we watch a lot of things and not just stocks and we're seeing in wti and brent. copper also joining us. the buyer bounces and anything can bounce. ipo week is good. brunswick study of m & a, highest activity in a long time. m & a ipo may be a commodity lift and bad day to be sure. >> even though with the caterpillar news and even with the fedex news. >> you have to pick your spots. deere
believe in science. you often hear the left lecture on science. we are on the side of science. anybody who ignores the obvious point that if you expend more energy than you bring in, you die, whether a business, person, or country. the person who ignores that is against science. in the long run, a country that spends more than it raises cannot continue. it is an existential threat to our country. that was established by economist after economist. common sense confirms it. the federal debt, there's a bigger problem. >> let me quote dick cheney, who said ronald reagan taught us that deficits do not matter. dick cheney was wrong. he was wrong then and now. of course deficits matter, but any one of you who supported the bush plans has no right to speak. i helped bill clinton balance the budget and build a surplus. why? because we had good economic times. in good economic times, you pay down the deficit, but reagan and bush did not, and in bad you have to stimulate in the near term, as thank god president obama is doing. we democrats will balance the budget once again. >> paul, which is more im
bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> on capitol hill today the man who runs nasa was asked, what could be done if a large meteor were headed for new york city? his answer? pray. cnn's chris lawrence has more on today's hearings. pretty scary stuff going on, chris. >> you said it, wolf. the only reason people aren't scared out of their minds is the fact that it's so rare for one of these big rocks to hit the earth. but look. there are 10,000 to 20,000 asteroids out there big enough to devastate a continent and only 10% have been detected. russians saw a flash of light and heard the sonic boom. the meteor exploded with the force of a nuclear bomb. it did $30 million in damage and injured thousands. and no one saw it coming. >> we were fortunate that the events of last month were simply an interesting coincidence rather than a catastrophe. >> reporter: the nation's top science officials were called before congress tuesday to explain what they're doing to detect similar threats from space. >> objects as large
to life? scientists work to revive extinct animals. this isn't science fiction, it's real. >>> i'm brianna keilar. >> and i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the obama is standing with israel in a dangerous time in the region. >> his most urgent warning in syria, vowing that the assad regime will be held accountable if it has in fact used chemical weapons as the rebels claim. >> plet's go to jerusalem first with jessica. a very powerful meeting today. very interesting between the president and the prime minister. >> wolf, that's right. president obama here in jerusalem for the first overseas trip of his second term. a visit which in symbolism already president obama is emphasizing the u.s.'s commitment to ensuring israel's security and correcting any past sleights, real or perceived. president obama and prime minister netanyahu together in israel. they were acting like long-lost friends, joking, getting casual, complimenting each other's children while taking a little dig. >> they are very good looking young men who clearly got their
the country since 2009. they also say north korea is pouring money into science and technology. >>> the city of san jose is expected to approve a $7 million incentive for samsung to improve its company. it would replace existing offices with a more modern facility. right now the building offers 200,000 square feet of space but the company wants to expand it to 680,000 by building two ten story towers which would employ at least 10,000 people. >>> lowe's is being accused of december crimination. the chronicle is now reporting that six current and former employees have filed a lawsuit in superior court. they say lowe's hired minority employees to comply with an agreement a-- with the lowe's to be built. >>> the college says the boost is meant to help meet the demand for specific classes. more than 980 classes will be offered. the majority being english, math, and science courses. enrollment management was one area of criticism. a final decision on the schools accreditation could be made in june. >>> the golden state warriors are inching closer to a playoff spot. last night they played the firs
pores for visibly clearer skin in as little as 12 hours. yeah, it's fast. clearasil, the science of clear skin. (vo) current tv gets the converstion started next. >> i'm a slutty bob hope. >> you are. >> the troops love me. the sweatshirt is nice and all but i could use a golden lasso. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "bill press show," live on your radio, and current tv. >> bill: here we go 12 minutes before the top of the hour. the "full court press" on abmonday morning, march 18th. well, three months now since the december 14th massacre at sandy hook elementary school but for hedge funds and financial firms on wall street it has been business as usual. bill has made this a key issue of his. he joins us again on our news line this morning. bill also a candidate for mayor of new york city. good morning. >> hey bill it is a good to be back. >> bill: thanks for joining us again. i know you put out the word for investors to drop these gun manufacturers, and they are doing just the opposite right? >> most of them are. but we have seen a couple of companies go the other w
kids' education, science and research. they also cut medicaid which affects a lot of those seniors on medicare, about 20% of those seniors are also on medicaid. but it's at the end of that 10-year window that our republican colleagues then move to their voucher plan, premium support, i don't care what you call it. the only way you're going to achieve any savings compared to the baseline numbers, c.b.o. baseline that the chairman showed you, the only way you're going to do it is if you're capping the amount you're going to get so that seniors have to eat the costs and take the risks of rising health care. now, there's a better way to address that issue and that is the way we approach it in our budget and that is to build on the kind of reforms that we made in the affordable care act, in obamacare, which have helped and contributed to reducing the rapid rise in per capita health care costs and which as i pointed out earlier our republican colleagues included in their own budget. so, yes, we have to deal with these drivers of costs, including health care. but the way we propose to do
that this guy is not, a, qualified to do it. and there's nothing really there, it's junk science. so the judge will hear from both sides in the next 15 minutes and expected to rule from the defense, so the direct testimony can resume whether or not the judge will allow this part of it in we'll find out very soon. >> ted, before we get any kind of rulings at all, there is buzz now, not surprising, of a tv movie that is actually in the works. what do we know about that? >> yes, well, what we don't know is what it would be rated given all the graphic testimony in this case. >> no kidding. >> we know lifetime -- yeah, lifetime is making a movie about this. a made for tv movie, the jodi arias trial. they're in works on that. they've done this before. they did it with the drew peterson case, rob lowe was in that and they have one coming out in a couple weeks on the casey anthony case. rob lowe ironically is also in that one. we'll have to see what role he'd play in this one if he is, but bottom line getting terrific ratings on television and makes perfect sense to exploit that and make a tv movie ou
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